High Lonesome Ranch - February 18 - February 22, 2019

Audience
natural resource professionals

High Lonesome Ranch

High Lonesome Ranch

The High Lonesome Ranch sits along the spine of the continent on the Western Slope of the Colorado Rockies. A national park-scale landscape perfectly situated to help connect large ecosystems, we are right on a key habitat corridor. We are working to restore, conserve, and steward a large western landscape, which contributes to a western wild-way for wildlife to roam and thrive that stretches from Mexico to Canada. A private conservation organization founded over 20 years ago, we are addressing the challenges of stewarding this landscape for habitat connection while we still can, and encouraging people to use it. With mountain forests, grasslands, spring creeks, and alpine mesas at an altitude that ranges from 4,000 to 9,000 feet, the ranch is home to diverse wildlife and provides a vast playground for sports and wilderness activities.

0275 County Road 222
DeBeque, CO 81630
970.283.9420
Executive Secretary
Northeast Association of Fish & Wildlife Agencies
Gordon retired as Chief Wildlife Biologist for the State of New York in 2015 following a 35 year career as a wildlife biologist with New York, and now serves with the Northeast Association of Fish & Wildlife Agencies as Executive Secretary. Gordon is also very active on various committees of the Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies. An enthusiastic deer and turkey hunter, Gordon especially enjoys taking novice hunters afield, and teaching about our trapping and hunting heritage during the CLfT workshops.
President/Owner
Beartooth Strategies, LLC
I am owner/principal of Beartooth Strategies, a private environmental consulting business focusing on public policy, public lands, energy development and conservation of fish and wildlife resources and a Partner in Conservation First Enterprises. I am currently the Executive Director for the North American Grouse Partnership, senior energy advisor for The High Lonesome Ranch and senior policy advisor for the Mule Deer Foundation. I am the former Director for the TRCP Center for Responsible Energy Development and spent 16 years working for the BLM and Forest Service as a wildlife specialist in Wyoming, New Mexico, and Oregon.. I earned a Master’s degree in Public Administration from the University of Wyoming emphasizing on environmental policy and B. S. degree in Wildlife and Fisheries Science from the Pennsylvania State University. I am a TWS Certified Wildlife Biologist, TWS Fellow, Past President of the WY TWS Chapter, and the past Chair of the Editorial Advisory Board for The Wildlife Society’s magazine, The Wildlife Professional. I am former board member of the North American Grouse Partnership and I am a fellow of the National Conservation Leadership Institute. I reside in Red Lodge, Montana with wife, 2 kids, and 2 labs.
Associate Professor
South Dakota State Univeristy
I am a hunter, fisherman, birder, photographer, husband, dad and grandpa! I am a faculty member in the Department of Natural Resource Management at South Dakota State University; I teach Upland Game Management, Waterfowl Management, Wildlife Management and Ornithology. I've been fortunate to be able to work in my home state, where I grew up on a small family farm milking cows and hunting/fishing whenever I got a chance! Hunting and fishing as a youth have largely shaped my life and livlihood as an adult. I am so grateful for the opportunity to work in the CLfT family that offers me the opportunity to share my passion for our hunting traditions and their importance in conserving our natural resources.
CLfT Director
Conservation Leaders For Tomorrow
Zachary E. Lowe is the Director of the Conservation Leaders Tomorrow Program, which is housed within the Max McGraw Wildlife Foundation in Dundee, Il. He has a diverse professional background working within the disciplines of restoration ecology, research/extension, and conservation education. He holds a B.S. in Wildlife Science, a second in Fisheries and Aquatic Science, and a Ph.D. in Restoration Ecology from Purdue University where he maintains an Adjunct Faculty position within the Department of Forestry and Natural Resources. A native to the Midwest, Zach grew up as an avid outdoorsman and is passionate about hunting. He engages in trapping and fishing as the time and the seasons allow. Zach enjoys the culinary rewards of hunting and gardening and finds the preparation of game and local foods to be a year-round connection to the family’s seasonal harvest. Zach severs on The Wildlife Societies Editorial Advisory Board and assist with several national working groups dedicated to how hunting angling and trapping can ensuring the future of conservation for the collective benefit of all things wild.
Assistant Professor of Wildlife Management
Sul Ross State University/Borderlands Research Institute
Dr. Ryan S. Luna is a Research Scientist with Borderlands Research Institute, Chair of the Natural Resource Management Department, and an Associate Professor of Wildlife Management at Sul Ross State University. He teaches curriculum associated with the Wildlife Management program, and is a faculty advisor to the Range and Wildlife Club. Ryan’s interests focus on habitat use and foraging ecology. His primary research pertains to upland game bird ecology and management, and control techniques for feral hogs.

Prior to joining BRI, Ryan obtained a PhD at Texas State University. While at Texas State, he was a Doctoral NSF Fellow working in a GK-12 program. When not in middle school classrooms getting students interested in science, Ryan was working on his dissertation which focused on body size, rumen-reticulum functions, and dietary nutrition of white-tailed deer. Prior to his doctoral work, he earned an MS from the University of Texas at San Antonio. During this period he worked for the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio performing behavioral assays on Rhesus Macaques. After receiving his bachelor’s degree from Texas Tech University, Ryan worked as a Game Warden for New Mexico Department of Game and Fish until he returned to Texas to begin his master’s and doctoral work.
Orion-The Hunters'Institute
Eric is a retired Vermont Game Warden and Hunter Education Coordinator. His is the past executive director of the International Hunter Education Association and Orion-the Hunter's Institute. He currently serves on numerous boards including Orion, Backcountry Hunters and Anglers (BHA) and Lamoille River Paddlers Trail. An avid hunter and owner of an eager Brittany bird dog, he has a hard time finding time to do all the wilderness canoe trips, fishing trips to Montana and in Vermont, and the hikes in Norway that he would like to do. Eric has introduced hundreds of folks to the joys of the outdoors thru hunting, fishing and tripping, and touched thousands thru teaching, talks and writing. He is currently coordinating an ethics column in the BHA Outdoor Journal.
PhD Candidate
South Dakota State University
Lindsey is a PhD student at South Dakota State University. Lindsey is currently researching Greater Sage-Grouse on the eastern fringe of their distribution, and is particularly interested in the impact of West Nile virus to the population. Lindsey received a B.S. in Ecology with an emphasis in Fish and Wildlife Management from Montana State University in 2010 as well as a M.S. in Secondary Education from Black Hills State University in 2015. Lindsey has been an instructor for CLfT since 2016. Hunting has been a big part of her life and culture since she was a child and she truly enjoys sharing her passion and knowledge about hunting with others.
Assistant Professor and Program Director Wildlife and Forestry Conservation
Green Mountain College
Val grew up in a small town in Upstate NY and was an outdoors enthusiast at an early age. From the time she could say "zoologist", she knew she wanted to work with wildlife and conservation. She spent much of her time hunting and fishing with her family, who instilled an appreciation for wilderness in her and encouraged her love for wildlife. She completed her undergraduate at Cazenovia College, majoring in Environmental Studies. She then ventured to Murray State University for a Master's in Biology where she studied the impacts of roads on a population of copperheads in Land Between the Lakes National Recreation Area. She returned to the Northeast to Binghamton University for her PhD where she studied movement patterns and population structure of the eastern tiger salamander on Long Island. She then worked for 2 years at the Bronx Zoo as a Curatorial Fellow in the Herpetology Department and then spent a year working for the Wildlife Conservation Society studying bison in Montana. She is currently Assistant Professor and Program Director of Natural Resources Management at Green Mountain College. Her current research focuses on human influences on wildlife health. She is a certified Hunter's Safety Instructor for both archery and firearms in Vermont. She also teaches courses on Hunting History, Ethics, and Management, and Wild Game Preparation at GMC. In her spare time, she does all things outdoors with her husband, baby daughter, and 5 dogs.
Conservation Officer, Sergeant
Iowa Dept. of Natural Resources, Law Enforcement Bureau
Joli began her career in conservation by volunteering and working seasonal positions in Colorado with the Student Conservation Association, the National Park Service, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and in Iowa with the Conservation Commission while attending and after graduation from the University of Nebraska at Kearney. In 1989, Joli left Colorado to return home to the Midwest to start her (now 28 year) career as an Iowa Conservation Officer. In 1999, she expanded her role as a law enforcement trainer with the IDNR, accepting the new position of Training Coordinator and eventually becoming Supervisor of Licensing and Training for fifteen years. She is now coming full circle, back in the field.
Joli’s passions have evolved from law enforcement training and “education through enforcement” to introducing new audiences to conservation and natural resources recreation and appreciation through programs including Outdoor Journey for Girls and Becoming an Outdoors Woman. She also enjoys working with Iowa State University in outdoor skills programming, Hunter Education, class presentations, and presenting for over two decades with ISU’s Program for Women in Science and Engineering (STEM).
Joli enjoys trailrunning, bicycling, and paddling with her partner and dogs. She finds great joy and deep value in bird hunting (especially behind her late, beloved springer, Abbey), firearm and bow hunting deer from a treestand, and sitting in the spring woods calling turkeys.