High Lonesome Ranch - January 21 - January 25, 2019

Audience
natural resource professionals

High Lonesome Ranch

High Lonesome Ranch

The High Lonesome Ranch sits along the spine of the continent on the Western Slope of the Colorado Rockies. A national park-scale landscape perfectly situated to help connect large ecosystems, we are right on a key habitat corridor. We are working to restore, conserve, and steward a large western landscape, which contributes to a western wild-way for wildlife to roam and thrive that stretches from Mexico to Canada. A private conservation organization founded over 20 years ago, we are addressing the challenges of stewarding this landscape for habitat connection while we still can, and encouraging people to use it. With mountain forests, grasslands, spring creeks, and alpine mesas at an altitude that ranges from 4,000 to 9,000 feet, the ranch is home to diverse wildlife and provides a vast playground for sports and wilderness activities.

0275 County Road 222
DeBeque, CO 81630
970.283.9420
President
The Longleaf Alliance
Robert has been the President of The Longleaf Alliance since 2012 and oversees all Alliance activities in the 9-state range of the Longleaf Pine. The Alliance has 17 staff members located in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, North Carolina and South Carolina. Robert has a BS from NC State in Wildlife Biology and a MS from LSU in Marine Science. With 39 years of wildlife and conservation related experience, he has worked all over the US and Canada on projects as varied as waterfowl and wetlands research, wild turkey restoration and habitat restoration of wetlands and longleaf pine forests. His passions are his family, turkey hunting and habitat restoration (especially longleaf) on the family farm in Duplin County North Carolina.
North Texas Hunter Education Specialist
Texas Parks and Wildlife Department
Aquatic Invasive Species Program Coordinator
Iowa Department of Natural Resources
Kim Bogenschutz is the Aquatic Invasive Species (AIS) Program Coordinator for the Iowa Department of Natural Resources (IDNR). She has developed and directed the IDNR AIS Program since its inception in 2000. Prior to her current position, she worked for the Minnesota DNR, US Fish and Wildlife Service, Iowa Department of Transportation, and IDNR in a variety of capacities including fisheries management, private lands restoration, environmental review and permitting, and nongame wildlife. Kim is vice-chair of the Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Invasive Species Committee, past chair of the Mississippi River Basin Panel on Aquatic Nuisance Species, and is on the Board of Directors for the Midwest Invasive Plant Network. A native of Minnesota, Kim earned a BA in Biology from Gustavus Adolphus College and an MS in Fisheries Science from South Dakota State University. In addition to CLfT, she shares her love of the outdoors as an instructor for Outdoor Journey for Girls and Becoming an Iowa Outdoors Woman. Kim, her husband, Todd, and their daughter, Veronica Brooke, reside on 50 acres along the bluffs of the Des Moines River in Madrid, Iowa, with their two bird dogs. In addition to fishing, hunting, and boating, she enjoys attending her daughter’s dance and sports events, spending time at the family cabin in Minnesota, and coaching cheer and dance teams.
Regional Supervisor
Utah Division of Wildlife Resources
Director
GA Wildlife Resources Division
Rusty Garrison serves as the Director of the Georgia Department of Natural Resources’ Wildlife Resources Division.
Mr. Garrison has been with DNR for 18 years having served most recently as the manager of the Charlie Elliott Wildlife Center in Mansfield, Georgia. He has served in numerous other capacities, including Assistant Chief of Game Management, State Coordinator of Project WILD, and Chief of the DNR Mountain Search and Rescue Team. Before his career with DNR, Mr. Garrison worked for the University of Georgia Cooperative Extension Service for nearly nine years.
Rusty has served as a CLfT instructor since 2012. He has assists with classes mostly at Charlie Elliott Wildlife Center in Georgia; but also teaches at Max McGraw in Illinois and at facilities in Colorado and Idaho.
Mr. Garrison holds the degrees of Bachelor of Science in Animal Sciences and a Master of Science in Wildlife Biology, both from the University of Georgia. He is active in his local community, having previously volunteered as a fire fighter and first responder for his county EMS. Mr. Garrison has traveled to over 65 countries while on mission trips and remains active in his local church. He is married to his wife Sue, has three daughters, and is a proud grandfather.
Associate Professor
Ohio State University School of Environement and Natural Resources
Robert J. Gates is Associate Professor of Wildlife Ecology and Management in the School of Environment and Natural Resources at Ohio State University. Bob grew up and began hunting with his father in east central Wisconsin, after which his family moved to the hunting paradise of eastern South Dakota, where he received his B.S. in Wildlife Science from South Dakota State University. Bob’s graduate degrees were from Montana State University (M.S.) and Southern Illinois University at Carbondale (Ph.D.). Bob’s travels have provided many memorable hunting, fishing and other outdoors activities that he has shared with family and friends in 19 states/provinces in the U.S. and Canada. He is most proud of passing on the hunting and fishing traditions to his younger brother Dale, and to his sons Eric and Jared. Bob is an avid bird hunter who most enjoys hunting pheasants and prairie grouse over pointing dogs (especially Brittanys) and also hunts doves, waterfowl and big game. Bob has taught classes and conducted research with graduate students for nearly 30 years, first at Southern Illinois University, and currently at Ohio State University. His research interests are primarily focused on ecology and management of upland game birds, waterfowl and other wetlands-dependent wildlife, and conservation of wetlands and early successional habitats. He has been a member of The Wildlife Society (TWS) for more than 30 years, serving as state chapter president in Illinois and Ohio, and President
Assistant Chief - Forest Resources Division
Michigan DNR
Area Wildlife Biologist
USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service
Noe is the Area Wildlife Biologist for USDA-NRCS in northeast Colorado. She works with farmers and ranchers to develop high quality wildlife habitat on privately owned lands.
Professor and Director, Institute for Water Resources Science and Technology
Texas A&M University in San Antonio
RUDOLPH “RUDY” ROSEN, Ph.D., is a Visiting Professor and Director of the Institute for Water Resources Science and Technology at Texas A&M University in San Antonio, a Fellow of The Meadows Center for Water and the Environment at Texas State University, and a former Research Associate at the Harte Research Institute for Gulf of Mexico Studies at Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi. He is a former Director of Wildlife, Fisheries and Coastal Resources for the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department and was also Executive Director of Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, where he served in the cabinet for the environment of two governors.

Dr. Rosen specializes in wildlife and fisheries conservation organization management, leadership, fundraising, and advocacy. He has served in international, national, and regional executive leadership positions in the National Wildlife Federation, Ducks Unlimited, and Safari Club International and its foundation. Rosen has served on over 130 nonprofit and government national and international boards, commissions and committees on fish and wildlife management, and has written over 500 articles, blogs and presentations on organizations, natural resources conservation, and policy. He has often appeared before the US Congress and state legislative bodies to testify on wildlife and fish resource conservation matters.
Retired
Idaho Dept Fish and Game
1961-70: BS Fish and Game Management, MS Wildlife Management, Oregon State University. Assistant in Veterinary Parasitology, Dept Veterinary Medicine, Oregon State University. 1970-1996: Conservation Officer, Wildlife Research Biologist, Regional Wildlife Manager, Idaho Dept Fish and Game. 1996-present: Wildlife contract and consultant work, fly fishing and hunting guide.
CLfT National Coordinator
Prior to coming to CLfT, David was a Captain with the Indiana Department of Natural Resources Law Enforcement Division where he served for 27 1/2 years in a variety of positions including Field Officer, Environmental Investigator, Homeland Security Coordinator, Training Administrator and the Education and Training Section Commander. David holds a number of instructor certifications and specialties that includes: ILETB Master Instructor, Law Enforcement Firearms Instructor (Handgun, Shotgun and Patrol Rifle), 4H Shooting Sports Shotgun Instructor, Muzzleloading Rifle, Range Safety Officer, Indiana and Illinois Hunter Education Instructor and Indiana Trapper Education Instructor. David is a 1980 graduate of Vincennes University with an Associate of Science degree in Conservation Law Enforcement and a graduate of the 191st Session of the FBI National Academy. He is a three-term president of the Association of Natural Resource Enforcement Trainers (ANRET)(now a subcommittee of NAWEOA). David served as Secretary of the International Hunter Education Association, IHEA from 2009 to 2011.
Professor Emeritus
Utah State University
Michael L. Wolfe, grew up on Long Island, New York. He received a B.S. in Wildlife Management from Cornell University and a doctorate in Wildlife Science from the University of Göttingen, Germany. After a postdoctoral research position working on the Isle Royale moose/wolf project, he joined the faculty of the (USU) College of Natural Resources in 1970, where he taught a spectrum of terrestrial wildlife and natural resource courses, . Mike’s principal research interests were in the area of ungulate and carnivore ecology and management. He worked with several cervid species as well as bison, mountain goats and feral equids and led a 17-year study of cougars in Utah. He had a long working relationship with management agencies, including a two-year contract with the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources as Mammals Program Coordinator. Mike has also lived and worked extensively abroad, including in the former Soviet Union, Australia and South America. These teaching and research assignments were under the auspices of various exchange programs including the Fulbright Commission, Organization of American States and the National Academy of Sciences. Currently, he is actively involved in wetland restoration on a conservation easement along the Bear River in northern Utah. Mike is a life-long hunter, but shares this avocation with other interests such as curling, nature photography and playing the concertina. He has been an instructor with the CLfT program since 2009.